Also known as the Museum City of Cuba, Trinidad is one of the places with the greatest tradition, culture and history of the Caribbean country.

Presumed to be one of the most comprehensive and preserved architectural ensembles in the Americas, these attributes have allowed it to be recognized as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO since 1988.

The one originally founded by the Spaniards as Villa de la Santísima Trinidad, gives the visitor a trip to the past of Cuban history. Walking through its finely paved streets and glimpsing the luxurious colonial houses of neoclassical style, is one of the charms of this beautiful city. However, what most seduces Cuban and foreign tourists is to discover in this locality of long ago, a completely revitalized and cosmopolitan city.

The carnival of San Juan, celebrated in June, is one of the most popular festivities in the city, and traditionally attractively selected young people are flown around in floats and parades during the last days of the festivity. In the same way, in the week of culture in January, artists from all over the country visit the Trinitarian people and various cultural activities are carried out throughout the year.

Among the most famous constructions is the Palace of Count Brunet, the current headquarters of the Romantic Museum, where decorative art pieces are exhibited, many of them brought from Europe. They are also architectural icons of the city, the Plaza Mayor, the Church of the Holy Trinity, the Cantero Palace, among many others that give the Trinitarian town an exceptional historical value.

In addition to all these charms, there are first-class hotel facilities such as Hotel Ancon, Trinidad del Mar, Costa Sur and Iberostar Trinidad.

The Trinitarian city remains almost intact. This jewel of Cuban architecture seems to evade the passing of time, which is why it is a place of inescapable stay for vacationers, who will feel the moving experience of discovering in the Cuban colonial era.

For Visits: Trinidad. Sancti Spiritus. Cuba (“21.80526; -79.98438”)

by: Lys Alfonso Bergantiño