If you are passing through the commonly known as Reina Street, in Central Havana, the majestic and stately Parish of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and Saint Ignatius of Loyola, known by the capitals as the Church of Reina, will surely prevail before your eyes.

This is one of the most beautiful and colossal Catholic temples in the city. The Church is considered the highest church in Cuba, with a 77-meter high tower that stands out from several points in Havana and contrasts with the urban landscape.

The Church of Reina arose from the idea of the Jesuit Fathers to create a temple in which they could dedicate themselves to their professions, at that time, attend classes and the functioning of the educational institution. Its main founders were four wealthy families of the city.

Built between 1914 and 1923, the church is an oasis within the hustle and bustle of the Havana city. It is the perfect place to enjoy the tranquility and spirituality that your space offers.

In a neo-Gothic style, the parish church boasts a pointed arch, small walls, high pointed vaults and large windows with luminous stained-glass windows that represent Jesus and the Virgin Mary.

The light penetrates through the narrow windows, creating amazing plays of light and shadow, which can be seen more intensely in the morning hours.

Inside it stands out the altar, composed of alabaster, wood and bronze, where a monumental image of the Sacred Heart is erected as an act of blessing the faithful and visitors.

The Church of Reina is one of those places that by its historical and architectural values constitutes a symbol of the Cuban capital, sanctuary of culture and idiosyncrasy.

For visits: Reina street (Avenue Bolívar), between Gervasio and Belascoaín (Padre Varela). Centro Habana (23.131873, -82.369033)

by: Lys Alfonso Bergantiño